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“Double Egress” Doors vs. “Double Acting” Doors

Double egress doors and double acting doors are commonly confused. Read on to discover the differences in application and purpose, and contact LaForce with any additional questions! We also encourage you to save our Door, Frame, and Hardware Glossary for handy reference.

What are “Double Egress” Doors and “Double Acting” Doors?

 

Double Acting Doors

Definition:
A double acting door, also known as a double swinging door or impact traffic door, is a single door or a pair of doors in which the door(s) is able to swing in both directions because of the double acting hinge or pivot hinges. Usually, when there is a pair of doors, the door to the right is considered the active door when viewing the door from the outside (keying side).

Common Uses:
These doors are a cost-effective solution for fast and efficient, two-way movement through an opening where a visual and/or sound barrier is necessary to separate two areas.

Frame Application:
The frame is “cased opened”; therefore, there are no stops or rabbets, which allows the doors to swing freely in both directions.

Areas of Use:
Shipping/receiving areas, restaurant kitchens, supermarkets, grocery stores,  warehouses, storage facilities, etc.

Notes:
Common add-on hardware for this type of opening application includes bumper strips made of ¾” to 1 ½” thick extruded aluminum alloy, spring bumpers, impact/base plates and jamb guards. This extra hardware can help prevent damage to the high traffic doors that are often knocked and bumped.

Double Egress Doors

Definition:
This type of application is always a pair of doors in which the doors can only swing in the opposite direction. Additionally, each door can only be operated from acting leaf side, which is typically the push/right side to coincide with the traffic flow.

Common Uses:
An opening with double egress application provides quick but safe exit and entry into an area because the traffic on the opposite side of the door does not collide with the oncoming traffic.

Frame Application:
A frame with opposite stops and rabbets is necessary to accommodate the doors swinging in the opposite direction.

Areas of Use:
In corridors, typically in hospitals, schools, clinics, nursing homes, etc.

Notes:
Common hardware used for this application is a vertical rod exit device. There is typically no hardware on the pull side of the door.